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International Commission

Search for legal records for prosecutions of mining industries in B. C. for violations of Section 36(3) of the Fisheries Act by the Canada government was done by the Submitting Parties. It came up with three cases from 1983, 1984 and 1985. The first case ended with the guilty verdict of Equity Silver in 1983. It also cost them a fine of $12,000. The outcome of the second case was the conviction of Carolin Mines in 1984.

A fine of $135,000 was collected from them. The third case, which involved the Westmin Resources, resulted in their conviction in 1985. They paid a fine of $80,000 for their offense. These occurrences are clear and undeniable evidences of the incessant violations of Fisheries Act Section 36(3). The decreasing number of salmon populations in British Columbia only shows the samsung organizational structure 2016 of Canadian Government in effectively enforcing environmental laws.

(THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA’S FAILURE TO ENFORCE THE FISHERIES ACT AGAINST MINING COMPANIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1998) Furthermore, Canada faces some complaints recently regarding the lax implementation of environmental laws. According to a report, Canadian and American environmental groups collided to file a formal grievance to the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) of North America. It came to their knowledge the alleged failure of Canada to enforce its Species at Risk Act.

A side agreement to the North American Free Trade Agreement or NAFTA was done by Canada, Mexico, and United States. Under this, they created an international organization, which is the CEC. Because many species have been migrating to the US, Mexico, and other countries, the situation of the Canadian government regarding the protection of species at risk has become internationally significant. The president of Nature Canada, Julie Gelfand, stated that “Canada is failing its duty of care toward the nations’ wildlife”.

A fine of $135,000 was collected from them. The third case, which involved the Westmin Resources, resulted in their conviction in 1985. They paid a fine of $80,000 for their offense. These occurrences are clear and undeniable evidences of the incessant violations of Fisheries Act Section 36(3). The decreasing number of salmon populations in British Columbia only shows the constant failures of Canadian Government in effectively enforcing environmental laws.

(THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA’S FAILURE TO ENFORCE THE FISHERIES ACT AGAINST MINING COMPANIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1998) Furthermore, Canada faces some complaints recently regarding the lax implementation of environmental laws. According to a report, Canadian and American environmental groups collided to file a formal grievance to the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) of North America. It came to their knowledge the alleged failure of Canada to enforce its Species at Risk Act.

A side agreement to the North American Free Trade Agreement or NAFTA was done by Canada, Mexico, and United States. Under this, they created an international organization, which is the CEC. Because many species have been migrating to the US, Mexico, and other countries, the situation of the Canadian government regarding the protection of species at risk has become internationally significant. The president of Nature Canada, Julie Gelfand, stated that “Canada is failing its duty of care toward the nations’ wildlife”.

The president also added that their organization “wants Canada to take the Species at Risk Act seriously”. Additionally, the environmental groups claim that federal government’s failure in enforcing the Act has resulted to some delays in the enlistment of critically endangered species, rejection of records for some species that are methodically proven to be at risk, unsuccessful identification and protection of habitats that species need for survival, and their total lack of protection in some provinces.

These happenings may lead to a heightened risk of Canadian species extinction. ("International Commission asked to review Canada’s failure to enforce endangered species law ", 2006) Moreover, the Standing Committee of Environment and Sustainable Development released a report that shows a depressing portrait of enforcement organization of Environment Canada. In relation to this report, Barry N. Spiegel, a lawyer at the Toronto office of an environmental law firm, used the terms ‘confusion, chaos, cognitive dissonance, and denial’ to describe the current situation and performance of Environment Canada.

The committee also claimed that the implementation of federal environmental laws is patchy and insufficient. Accordingly, these conditions do not affect only the environment, but also the administration’s operations emasculate the environmental accomplishments of the leading industries of Canada. (Spiegel, 1998)

The president also added that their organization “wants Canada to take the Species at Risk Act seriously”. Additionally, the environmental groups claim that federal government’s failure in enforcing the Act has resulted to some delays in the enlistment of critically endangered species, rejection of records for some species that are methodically proven to be at risk, unsuccessful identification and protection of habitats that species need for survival, and their total lack of protection in some provinces.

These happenings may lead to a heightened risk of Canadian species extinction. ("International Commission asked to review Canada’s failure to enforce endangered species law ", 2006) Moreover, the Standing Committee of Environment and Sustainable Development released a report that shows a depressing portrait of enforcement organization of Environment Canada. In relation to this report, Barry N. Spiegel, a lawyer at the Toronto office of an environmental law firm, used the terms ‘confusion, chaos, cognitive dissonance, and denial’ to describe the current situation and performance of Environment Canada.

The committee also claimed that the implementation of federal environmental laws is patchy and insufficient. Accordingly, these conditions do not affect only the environment, but also the administration’s operations emasculate the environmental accomplishments of the leading industries of Canada. (Spiegel, 1998)

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